Croup

Fall is now giving way to winter. That means it is the season for croupie babies! Some of the classic signs of croup (aka acute laryngotracheobronchitis) can be remembered by the 3 “s”:

S = Seal-like cough

S = Stridor

S = Steeple sign on X-ray

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Thanks for reading. In the coming weeks, The WM will return to the “Triads, pentads, and classic presentations” series. If you have any to share, please do! Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.

Follow The Weekly Mnemonic to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

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Back to delirium

Last month, this post gave some memory tools for delirium. If you recall, the “W” in the mnemonic “I WATCH DEATH” stands for withdrawal. Alcohol withdrawal may lead to an acute episode of delirium called delirium tremens. “DT’S HELL” summarises the signs and symptoms that may be found in this condition.

D = Delirium, which is often worse at night
T = Tremor (aka “the shakes”)
S = Sympathetic overactivity (i.e. fever, tachycardia, hypertension, sweating)

H = Hallucinations (which are often visual or tactile)
E = ESR (raised)
L = Leucocytosis
L = LFTs (impaired)

That’s all for this week!

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 Thanks for reading. In the coming weeks, The WM will return to the “Triads, pentads, and classic presentations” series. If you have any to share, please do! Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.

Follow The Weekly Mnemonic to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

 

Treatment algorithms for lung disease: BLOP and RIPE

Happy November everyone! Today we focus on mnemonics for the treatment of dyspnea and tuberculosis.

“BLOP” is a cute mnemonic I learned from a staff physician to remember what to give your patient who is presenting with dyspnea. Sometimes we can’t be sure whether the cause of the shortness of breath is pulmonary or cardiac. Therefore, you may end up treating for both and giving your patient some “BLOP” therapy:

B = B2-adrenergic agonist (e.g. salbutamol)
L = Lasix (aka furosemide)
O = Oxygen
P = Prednisone

We are now all aware that tuberculosis is not just a historical disease (I have seen a couple of cases myself) and the first-line agents for its treatment are commonly remembered by the mnemonic “RIPE”:

R = Rifampin
I = Isoniazid (aka INH)
P = Pyrazinamide (aka PZA)
E = Ethambutol

Hopefully these will be useful to you all on the wards!

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Have a great week!! Thank you all for reading.

Follow The Weekly Mnemonic to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.

If you like clubbing…

You might party harder with this mnemonic submitted by our friend rebch. I know, bad joke… but who can resist a pun?

C = Cirrhosis, congestive heart failure
L = Lung disease- malignancy, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis
U = Ulcerative colitis/Crohn’s disease
B = Biliary, Bulimia

Another blogger cphy wanted me to share her mnemonics as well. Here’s a link to her blog:

http://cphy.wordpress.com/med-mnemonics/

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Have a great week!!

Thanks to rebch and cphy for sharing.

Follow The Weekly Mnemonic to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.