Anatomy series (part 3)

This week’s mnemonic was shared by a WM reader, “Mrs James Barry”. It fits perfectly into the new anatomy series. To remember what structures cross the diaphragm, you may use the phrase “I ate 10 eggs at twelve”.

 

I ate = I 8 = IVC at the 8th thoracic vertebra

Ten eggs = 10 E = Esophagus at the 10th thoracic vertebra

At twelve = A 12 = Aorta at the 12th thoracic vertebra

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Thanks for the clever mnemonic, Mrs. James Barry! Happy December to All!

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Confounders and confusers (part 1)

As you know, TheWeeklyMnemonic has a few blog posts series running. Well, it is time to start a new one. This is the first of the “Confounders and confusers” series where tips and tricks for differentiating confusing terms will be shared. As usual, if you have a doozy in your back pocket, please share!

This week’s confuser is “miosis vs. mydriasis”.

Miosis = indicates small pupils because an iota is a very small quantity

Mydriasis = dilated pupils

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Hope you like this new series! Have a wonderful week.

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Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.

Your submissions

Thanks to those who submitted suggestions to TheWeeklyMnemonic in the past month.

One reader suggested the “AMERICA” mnemonic for the TIMI risk score which was previously posted here. It is always nice to review things that we have forgotten!

Rebecca shared an equally practical mnemonic for the management of opioid prescriptions for chronic pain. She obtained this from her palliative care course. The mnemonic in question is the “5A Opioid monitoring tool“, which is summarized below. You may refer to this link for a PDF which goes into more detail on how to use one version of the 5As.

• Analgesia (i.e. degree of pain relief provided by the opioids)

• Activities of daily living (i.e. the patient’s physical and psychosocial function)

• Adverse effects and remedies for these (i.e. constipation, nausea, etc.)

• Aberrant drug-taking behaviour (i.e. abuse/misuse)

• Accurate medication record

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Thanks for the contributions. Keep them coming! Have a great week.

The Weekly Mnemonic has more than 10, 000 views! To celebrate, in December, The WM will change its look and will offer a Christmas prize to one of its followers! Have a wonderful week.

Follow us to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.

Anatomy series (part 2)

As promised, The WM will be offering an anatomy series and here is part 2! Today’s featured organ is the spleen.

The spleen is known as the “odd” organ. That is, the odd-numbered organ. To describe the anatomy of the spleen, all you have to know are the numbers 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11.

  • The spleen is 1 inch x 3 inches x 5 inches in dimensions
  • The spleen is usually about 7 ounces in weight
  • The spleen is found under ribs 9 and 11 (i.e. its surface anatomy)

Remember: the spleen is tucked below the diaphragm. You will only feel it on your physical exam if it is enlarged.

Last fact of the week: massive splenomegaly is felt 8 cm below the costal margin and weighs more than 1kg (!!).

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The Weekly Mnemonic has more than 10, 000 views! To celebrate, in December, The WM will change its look and will offer a Christmas prize to one of its followers! Have a wonderful week.

Follow us to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.