Triads, pentads and classic presentations (part 11)

Apologies for not having posted in a while! The Weekly Mnemonic is back with number 11 of the “Triads” series. This time, 3 triads with the focus is on women’s health are presented.

Meig’s syndrome will resolve with resection of the benign ovarian mass and consists of the triad of: 1) ascites 2) pleural effusion 3) benign ovarian tumour.

The female athlete triad consists of 3 conditions and is found in females participating in sports activities which value a low body weight: 1) eating disorder 2) amenorrhea 3) osteoporosis or osteopenia.

Polycystic ovary syndrome is an anovulatory state which includes the following 3 classic findings: 1) signs of hyperandrogenism (hirsutism, acne, hair loss, etc.) 2) oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea 3) polycystic appearance of ovaries on ultrasound.

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Happy Easter! Thanks for reading and/or following the blog. :)

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7 signs to a wet lung

This week, instead of a mnemonic, let’s talk about what it means for a chest X-ray to “look wet”. If you know of a memory trick to remember these signs of pulmonary edema, please share! Here are the 7 signs of a “wet lung”:

1) The classic “bat wing” pattern (i.e. fluffy appearance of alveolar infiltrates in a wing- like distribution around the heart)

2) Cephalization of the pulmonary vessels (i.e. vessels in the upper chest are more prominent)

3) Air bronchograms (i.e. the dark air-filled spaces of the bronchi are outlined by the fluid of the alveoli)

4) Peribronchial cuffing (i.e. bronchial wall thickening from fluid)

5) Kerley B lines (i.e. septal lines of 1-2 cm at the lung periphery)

6) Enlarged cardiac silhouette

7) Pleural effusions

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Have a great week! There are only 10 days until Christmas. Make sure to check the New Year’s Announcements page if you like prizes.

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From “What to order?” to “What did I order?”

This week, we are back with two memory tricks for lab tests. The first will help you remember the broad categories of tests that you may want to order when you have collected a sample (e.g. pleural fluid, synovial fluid, cerebrospinal fluid). The second will help you keep your PT and PTTs straight in your mind.

1) The 4 Cs for fluid analysis (note: all may not apply):

Chemistry (e.g. pH, LDH, glucose, protein)

Cell count and differential

Cytology

Culture

2) PT is a measurement of the extrinsic pathway and PTT is a measurement of the intrinsic pathway. You can remember this using the following memory aid:

PTT has the extra T “in” it and therefore is the intrinsic pathway. PT has the extra “T” excluded and therefore reflects the extrinsic pathway.

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Hopefully you will find this to be helpful on the wards. Thanks for reading!

Follow The Weekly Mnemonic to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.