Not just a reflex

Can’t remember the nerve roots associated with the reflexes you are eliciting? It’s easy. Count 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 and go from toe to forearm to biceps to triceps!

Reflex diagram

 

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Have a great week!

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Study resources

Hello TheWeeklyMnemonic readers,

Back from my blog vacation. Posts will trickle in more regularly again. I will make my best efforts to stay true to the “weekly” nature of the blog.

This week, I would like to provide you with some additional resources you can use for supplementing your studies.

  • Shola Vaughn, a dermatology resident, is running a website all about helping medical students through their sometimes-challenging medical studies. Here is a link to her impressive body of work: SholaMD
  • Sketchy medicine is a fun website I enjoy checking out once in a while. Partly for the useful tidbits of information and partly because of the quircky sketches.
  • For those looking for a relief from your studies but want some medicine-related entertainment, check out the facebook group “Today at MedSchool” which has some funny real-life anecdotes pertaining to the everyday lives as medical professionals.

What resources do you like to use to study? If you know of a good one or would like to share the one you have created, contact us or comment below.

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That’s it for this week folks!

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Fetal monitoring

During delivery, you’ll most certainly be asked to keep an eye on the fetal heart monitoring strip.

“VEAL CHOP” is a memory trick to remember what each of the patterns mean. The first word of the mnemonic, “veal”, represents the different patterns you may observe. The second word, “chop”, tells you what each pattern indicates about the state of the fetus. The first letter of “veal” corresponds with the first letter of “chop”, the second letter of “veal” corresponds with the second letter of “chop”. etc.

V = variable

E = early accelerations

A = accelerations

L = late decelerations

C = cord compression

H = head compression

O = OK (i.e. it’s all good!)

P = placental insufficiency

“HELP VC” is another one you can use to remember the causes of decelerations

HE = head compression –>early

LP = late–>placental insufficiency

VC = variable–> cord compression

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Have a great week! Thanks for reading. Happy studying.

Follow us to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.

Triads, pentads and classic presentations (part 11)

Apologies for not having posted in a while! The Weekly Mnemonic is back with number 11 of the “Triads” series. This time, 3 triads with the focus is on women’s health are presented.

Meig’s syndrome will resolve with resection of the benign ovarian mass and consists of the triad of: 1) ascites 2) pleural effusion 3) benign ovarian tumour.

The female athlete triad consists of 3 conditions and is found in females participating in sports activities which value a low body weight: 1) eating disorder 2) amenorrhea 3) osteoporosis or osteopenia.

Polycystic ovary syndrome is an anovulatory state which includes the following 3 classic findings: 1) signs of hyperandrogenism (hirsutism, acne, hair loss, etc.) 2) oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea 3) polycystic appearance of ovaries on ultrasound.

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Happy Easter! Thanks for reading and/or following the blog. :)

Follow us to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.

Confounders and confusers (part 2)

The “Confounders and confusers” series offers tips and tricks for differentiating easily confused terms. For part 2 of confounders and confusers, let’s talk hematology.

To differentiate between Hemophilia A and Hemophilia B and which clotting factor is defective in each condition, use the following trick:

Hemophilia A = Factor VIII    because “A” sounds a lot like the word “eight”

Hemophilia B = Factor IX      because “A” comes before “B” and “8” comes before “9”

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Thanks for reading!

Follow us to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.

7 signs to a wet lung

This week, instead of a mnemonic, let’s talk about what it means for a chest X-ray to “look wet”. If you know of a memory trick to remember these signs of pulmonary edema, please share! Here are the 7 signs of a “wet lung”:

1) The classic “bat wing” pattern (i.e. fluffy appearance of alveolar infiltrates in a wing- like distribution around the heart)

2) Cephalization of the pulmonary vessels (i.e. vessels in the upper chest are more prominent)

3) Air bronchograms (i.e. the dark air-filled spaces of the bronchi are outlined by the fluid of the alveoli)

4) Peribronchial cuffing (i.e. bronchial wall thickening from fluid)

5) Kerley B lines (i.e. septal lines of 1-2 cm at the lung periphery)

6) Enlarged cardiac silhouette

7) Pleural effusions

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Have a great week! There are only 10 days until Christmas. Make sure to check the New Year’s Announcements page if you like prizes.

Follow us to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.

Confounders and confusers (part 1)

As you know, TheWeeklyMnemonic has a few blog posts series running. Well, it is time to start a new one. This is the first of the “Confounders and confusers” series where tips and tricks for differentiating confusing terms will be shared. As usual, if you have a doozy in your back pocket, please share!

This week’s confuser is “miosis vs. mydriasis”.

Miosis = indicates small pupils because an iota is a very small quantity

Mydriasis = dilated pupils

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Hope you like this new series! Have a wonderful week.

Follow us to receive weekly posts directly in your inbox! Just enter your email address in the box on the top of the menu on the right and click “Follow”.

Click here to share a mnemonic for a future edition of The Weekly Mnemonic.